A Redbook.com survey — The Mom Gig — involved 558 women who identify as stay-at-home mothers. The moms were asked to make a detailed, hour-by-hour record of their daily activities, tasks and duties, and answered questions about their responsibilities.

Using that data, author Laura Vanderkam sorted the participants into four groups: the workers, the volunteers, the newbies and the caretakers.

The workers made up the largest group — with 34 percent of the moms falling into the category. These women work an average of 4.5 hours a day, on top of their regular mothering duties. Interestingly enough, two-thirds of all women surveyed reported contributing to their family income in one way or another.

Twenty-five percent reported running a business out of their home.

“I think it is generally positive that there are new ways to work these days,” Vanderkam told Today. “It means people can dial down and dial up their workforce involvement without it being a hard choice one way or the other.

The next largest group — the volunteers — spend a significant portion of their time helping out in their children’s classrooms and participating in kid-related activities. Nearly half of the “volunteer” women said they felt they made working moms’ lives easier by picking up slack at the schools.

Next up, the newbies. Nineteen percent of women surveyed fell into this group, which is defined as mothers who have children under the age of 2. Of this group, most see the stay-at-home mom gig as temporary — 59 percent reported a desire to return to work at some point.

Finally, the caretaker, who has at least one child with special needs. Moms in this group tend to experience more stress than those in the others — 39 percent report being very or extremely stressed most of the time, compared with 30 percent of moms overall.

Read more at WRAL.com

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